We continue with Selena week here at KISS FM. I was absolutely honored to be asked to host three screenings of the movie Selena at Lubbock's Alamo Drafthouse.

Two of the Selena screenings are on Thursday, March 9 at 7:15 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. The third happens Friday, March 10 at 6:30 p.m.

So some of you may be asking, what do I know about Selena and the Tejano music business?

Prior to working for KISS-FM, I worked for Power 104.3 as part of the morning show. I developed a strong love for the Tejano genre. But even before that, as a resident of Lubbock I was familiar with her music thanks to having many friends who were Hispanic.

The day Selena died was a dark day in Lubbock. I had left Texas Tech after speaking with my adviser, and needless to say, I saw many people driving around with their headlights on and blasting her music out of their car stereos. I heard the official announcement on what was then Z102. I was in shock, to say the least.

Even though it's been almost 22 years since her death, Selena's music still lives on.

There are three total screenings of the film, but seating is very limited at this point. For tickets and information visit Alamo Drafthouse's website.

Hope to see you there!

"Selena'' brings freshness and heart to the life story of a little girl from Corpus Christi, Texas, who had big dreams and was lucky enough to realize almost all of them before her life was cut short. Selena Quintanilla was poised to become the first female singer to cross over from Spanish to English markets when she was shot dead on March 31, 1995.

By the time she died, the English-speaking Selena (Jennifer Lopez) had conquered the Spanish charts, dominated Mexican-American pop music, and even won acceptance in Mexico, despite her shaky Spanish and an American accent. She'd had No. 1 hits, won a Grammy, and was about to go on tour to promote her first English album. "Everybody's gonna wonder how I learned English so fast,'' she joked. Then it all ended when an employee shot her in an argument over theft."