In time, this article will either prove me a prophet or a dunce, but if the majority of employers that are currently allowing employees to work from home make that situation permanent, I believe Lubbock will experience a huge surge in residents.

It comes down to one thing: the cost of living. According to some newly accrued data, over half of the folks who found themselves working from home said they would consider relocating. And 22 percent of people said they would do so for a lower cost of living. Everyone else wanted "a change in scenery," whatever that means.

Lubbock has a very low cost of living compared to the rest of Texas. Groceries and (believe it or not) utilities are lower than average. Housing is significantly less expensive than other areas, especially if you plan to buy. Medical services are a little higher than average for Texas, but if you're healthy, that probably won't factor into your decision.

There are other great reasons to relocate to Lubbock, but the major one is the virtually non-existent traffic. Between I-27, Loop 289, the Marsha Sharp Freeway, and, coming soon, Loop 88, getting where you want to go is usually at most 20 minutes. I get to 90 percent of the places I wish to go to in under 10 minutes easily and consistently.

Lubbock has also invested in cultural facilities that will add to the enjoyment of our city post-pandemic. The Buddy Holly Hall is stunning, our downtown is slowly but surely turning around and there's a constant influx of new and interesting eateries opening up. Texas Tech University has a gorgeous campus, and the school's men's basketball program remains competitive and exciting.

Of course, if a billion people show up on our doorstep, the cost of living will rise, along with the traffic. So let's say this: some of y'all are more than welcome. We are friendly folk, after all. Just not every dang one of you. That's what Austin is for.

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