Those people who enjoy being outraged at things need to find something else to be outraged about.

Apparently, here and there Olympians do a little something (or don't do a little something) that the folks at home don't approve of. Let this be a little reminder that none of your tax dollars or any funding for U.S. Olympic teams comes from the government. Zero.*

'Wait a minute, then how come they use the U.S. flag?' you say. Well, my fellow patriots, the U.S. flag is not for sale, nor should it ever be. And in this case, it's much like the Dallas Cowboys' silver star; it's just a symbol of the team the athletes are on. How much national pride the athlete's place in the flag is entirely up to them.

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Let's get real for a moment. How many athletes do you think are doing it 'just for the good ol' US of A'? How many athletes have you heard of who won at the Olympics, then just disappeared into a night stocker job at Target? These athletes, many of who do have a strong sense of national pride, are also doing it for themselves, their families, their job prospects, and the prospect of fame.

Here comes saying the quiet part out loud: U.S. Olympians have to pay their own way by beating the buses for funding. There are a lot of "Olympic Families" where the parents are deeply in debt. In other words, if they're taking the risk, they can behave however the hell they want. Taking it further, they're probably more worried about mom and dad cutting them off than your opinion.

Sorry to break this to everyone, but you have another option. You can wash the Cheetos dust off your fingers, wipe the crumbs off your chest and drag your TV-watching butt to the gym and go represent the U.S.A. in whatever way YOU seem fit.

*Some Olympic organizations had to apply for coronavirus relief, just like other businesses.

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