Some people say that small towns breed small minds, but that couldn't be further from the truth when it comes to graphic designer, artist, and Lubbock native Harrison Bucy.

Harry is a personal friend of mine and one of the coolest and most creative people I know. We grew up going to school together in this crusty old town and I could tell from the first time we met that I wanted to be his friend.

He was head-to-toe punk rock in 7th grade, with a big green mohawk. He looked nothing like the nerdy church kids I was used to seeing. Eventually, we became buddies. Hell, I'm pretty sure I had my first beer with him. I distinctly remember sneaking out of my parent's house to join Harry and a few other hooligans to drink a few Mickeys in the middle of the night.

But hey, let's get to the important stuff.

That weird kid Harrison Bucy grew up to be an incredibly talented artist, designing everything from posters to t-shirts and even dinnerware for some of the biggest names in the industry, including Meg Ryan, John Walsh and Tim McGraw. He spent four years working for Redstar Media, where he worked on prints and posters for bands like Spoon, Fish, The Decemberists, and The Alabama Shakes, just to name a few. He's even worked on prints for Cartoon Network, Nickelodeon, and big movies like The 40-Year-Old Virgin with Steve Carrell.

He moved back to Lubbock briefly and worked for the Buddy Holly Center as the educational assistant, a job that he really enjoyed. However, Bucy's interests and talent ultimately led him to bigger and better things.

I called him up to ask him a little bit about what makes him tick and how he got so dang cool.

"In high school, it was no surprise I wanted to get the hell out of Lubbock, and I just knew something else was out there," he said. "I met some guys in punk bands that taught me how to screen print and I thought it was so cool. I started making t-shirts, and then I thought, I want to do this. This could get me out of here."

That's exactly what it did. Bucy is now working as a graphic designer at Lumetta in Rhode Island, as well as running his own art business on the side. His personal style was clearly influenced by comic books and monster movies. The more I look at different photos to describe it, the weirder, and more interesting, it gets.

Bucy also gets a kick out of building model kits and refurbishing old army man toys. He's even helped museums to recreate various battle scenes.

If you're looking for some sweet t-shirts or prints for your band or yourself personally, you can check out his website and follow him on Instagram. Don't forget to support Lubbock artists, even if their talents take them far away.

Check out the art of Harrison Bucy below.

The Art of Lubbock Native Harrison Bucy

Enter your number to get our free mobile app