The hospitals are packed with patients and wait times in the emergency room are extremely high due to the number of new cases of COVID-19 in town. Shutting down would definitely make things worse for businesses that are still trying to recover, but money doesn't mean a whole lot when you are laying in a coffin.

We had nearly 1,200 new cases in Lubbock just on Wednesday (January 12th), and we've lost close to 1,000 people to the virus since the beginning of the pandemic.

Every single day, I'm seeing Facebook friends share memorials for their friends and family members that have died from COVID-19. It hasn't gone away. It never stopped. Things are getting bad out there. We're basically going everywhere without masks and only half of the population is actually vaccinated, leaving the other half totally unprotected.

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A local comedian asked me if I was planning on closing down the local stand-up comedy show I host every week at BarPM because of the uptick in cases. It's not something I had even considered, but the more I think about it, the more I wonder if I should. What are we supposed to do?

Texas doesn't seem to want to comply with science-based suggestions. The governor does NOT have your health and safety at the forefront of his mind. He has business at the forefront of his mind. Money. He is willing to sacrifice some of the population for the greater good of business and commerce, and at this point, maybe that's all we can really do. Sit back and watch it all play out. It feels cruel, but it's what's happening.

Please get vaccinated and boosted. Please trust science. Please help save people that refuse to save themselves. This has got to stop. We can't just keep watching people die like this and refusing to do anything about it. Please think about your grandparents, your friends, and your neighbors. Be a patriot and get vaccinated so that we can move far, far away from all of this bulls**t.

Answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

Vaccinations for COVID-19 began being administered in the U.S. on Dec. 14, 2020. The quick rollout came a little more than a year after the virus was first identified in November 2019. The impressive speed with which vaccines were developed has also left a lot of people with a lot of questions. The questions range from the practical—how will I get vaccinated?—to the scientific—how do these vaccines even work?

Keep reading to discover answers to 25 common COVID-19 vaccine questions.