Don't look now, but the calendar is changing, and the lawns are turning into shredded wheat, which means that winter will be here before you know it. However, this year, things will be a little different in our fair burg than ever before, especially when it comes to keeping your family warm during the inevitable sub-zero cold snap that we always seem to get here on the South Plains.

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This year, this guy is seemingly in charge of things over at Lubbock Polar & Light:

Screenshot: YouTube User-Nathan Dawson Meme: imgflip.com

For most citizens of the Hub City, this will be our first winter under the clutches of ERCOT. And we all know just how well things went for most of Texas last year during our deep freeze, right?

Getty Images

Yup, like that.

The last thing we want anyone to do is worry unnecessarily, but yeah, this winter is going to be interesting. One would hope that after last years stunning successes (pun absolutely intended), that LP&L and ERCOT want to do everything in their power to reassure folks that once the temperatures go down that we'll have nothing to worry about, and that our homes will stay as cozy roasty toasty as we want them to be.

Yeah, we'd hope.

The one recommendation we might have is that if you have an fireplace, be sure to stock up on some wood for a fire before everyone and their brother decides to make a run on it once we hit 32 degrees. At our house, my fireplace has a gas insert, so we'll have no problem getting a fire started. That does go a little way towards making me feel better, and hopeful that if there is a repeat of last year's power grid issues, that we won't turn into people-sicles.

But what gives me the feeling of a warm blanket when I think about the possibility about losing power at our home this year? Because our neighborhood has South Plains Electric Co-op.  Yep, roasty toasty.

Love ya, mean it.

 

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