Prohibition didn't work out.

Prohibition lasted from January 17, 1920 to December 5, 1933. It didn't work. Those who wanted booze could still get it. Those with money had an easier time and those without money made their own. Gangs and criminals and people who became criminals controlled the flow of liquor. Everything just went underground and that's not a good thing. The U.S. finally woke up and decided that its citizens wanted to be able to purchase alcohol.

All this begs the question, why is there still a prohibition on alcohol sales on Sunday? The ultimate experiment in going booze-free was a bust and nothing good came of it. The truth is, this is a church-driven proposition carried over from the old days with the thinking that maybe the drinkers will get up and go to church before drinking and/or will be forced to go dry on the Lord's day.  Of course, none of this has worked. People find a way to get what they want. whether it's from stocking up. or buying something "under the table".

We are not a world that operates Monday through Friday or even Monday through Saturday from eight to five anymore. We have a workforce that goes around the clock seven days a week and everyone should be allowed access to anything a retailer chooses to sell. Booze sold at two in the morning or on Sundays is no more or less dangerous than booze sold at any other time of the day.

There all bills in the Texas house to allow restaurants to continue "to-go" sales which were instituted during the pandemic. There's also a bill to change the Sunday rules. All of this should be consolidated to legal around the clock, 24 hours a day. It's 2021 and it's time to update to logical and sensible rules that are fair to everyone.

 

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