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People are using the term "pandemic fatigue" a little too much for my liking.

We have had about seven months of lockdowns, masks, isolation, curbside pickup, delivery, hand sanitizer, closed bars, open bars, closed bars, and everything else. We've also had the constant threat that one of our loved ones will get, or even die, from the coronavirus.

It all sounds pretty terrible, doesn't it? It's not that terrible. The people who claim "pandemic fatigue" have apparently led very sheltered lives.

Your grandpa stabbed Nazis for six years. Your uncle and family members did thirteen years in Afghanistan. There's the Iraq War for seven years, Vietnam for 19 years, three years for Korea, and so on. All of these brave men and women had experienced the horrors of war and their families had to dread that terrible knock on the door to say their loved ones aren't coming home.

It's three-to-six months or more for the average breast cancer chemo treatment. How about people that have a life-long battle with diabetes? Have you ever considered the stress of a parent with a special needs child?

I could give examples like that forever, and that's actually the point. Seven months of staying home and watching Netflix is not that big of a deal. By most accounts, you're probably going to have to suck it up for another 5-8 months. You may think I've lived a charmed life, but I haven't, and I could do that remaining time standing on my head.

My suggestion to you is simple: get way ahead on the stuff that you can do while you're stuck at home so you'll have time to do the things you want to do when things loosen up a bit.