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The ACLU dropped a bomb on 40 West Texas school districts.

The American Civil Liberties Union let several area schools know that their dress codes were "unconstitutional and discriminatory." Most of this seems to be about hair and hair length. At issue would be people with different types of hair (for ethnic or religious reasons) and the difference in length requirements between boys and girls -- i.e. if girls can have long hair, why can't boys?

It's hard to believe this is still an issue, but it is. As recently as 2013, there was a kerfuffle in the Frenship School District over a 6-year-old boy who wouldn't cut his hair. Not surprisingly, Frenship is one of the schools put on notice by the ACLU. Others include Shallowater, Idalou and New Deal.

As long as a kid doesn't have lice, hair length and color has zero effect on a kid's learning experience. It's neither distracting nor a problem for anyone other than superintendents and busy-body parents who were brought up believing it is. It just doesn't matter.

The real issue isn't parents determining their kid's hair length; it's parents wanting to determine your kid's hair length. So where are you at? I constantly see parents on Facebook say, 'If anyone tries messing with my kid, I'll...'

Well, they're messing with your kid. As a parent, it's your job to determine how your kid will look and behave.

The coronavirus pandemic is the perfect opportunity to put this issue to bed once and for all. Access to barbers, salons, and stylists is limited. Let the kid's hair do what it will do and dump these antiquated rules.

Have happy, hairy, colorful kids if that's what it takes to make it through 2020.


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